Partition advice for internal drive upgrade

23 posts / 0 new
Last post
mfox
mfox's picture
Partition advice for internal drive upgrade

Two situations really, both because I picked up larger SSD's for each of the laptops; both 240/256 GB to replace 120/128. For laptop 1 (the Acer), the issue is an extended partition holding three distros butting up against a Windows 10 partition. The Windows needs more room, as it is 95% full. If I clone the smaller disk on the larger, everything is preserved, but can I then move over the extended partition to make some extra space on the ntfs partition holding Windows. Or do I have to copy the Windows partitions first, then expand them, and then copy over the extended partition?

The second problem is with the Dell. It has an m.2 SATA disk, and I have nothing external that I can put the new one in; nor do I have any connector for it. So would I then clone the internal onto a different external drive, replace the SSD and clone back from the external drive serving as a clone?

Suggestions?

jasonw

If you're using Clonezilla, there is a setting (in the restore advanced settings) that will proportionally expand the filesystem. So if Windows took up 50% before, it will end up taking 50% of the new drive. Then you can go in after it's done and use gtparted to shrink the windows Partition if it's too big.

http://clonezilla.org/clonezilla-live/doc/02_Restore_disk_image/advanced...

For the second question, you don't have use clone. There is an option in Clonezilla that will let it backup an entire drive to a file that contains an image. That makes more sense for the process you're describing. Then when you restore, you'll do the same thing for the first drive (use the advanced function to restore it proportionally).

Jason

Computer enthusiast, beginner programmer, political geek.

ssfc72

Thanks for mentioning about , proportionally expand the file system, option, in Clonzilla! I didn't know about that, and I am sure I will make use of it, at some point.

mfox
mfox's picture

Credit goes to Jason. But bear in mind that if you choose that option, all partitions are expanded proportionally, including swap partitions and Windows recovery partitions. In the end, I'm not sure it was best to do it that way, as the other way I wasted less space. But since my space has effectively doubled, wasted space doesn't matter in the short term. One could always go back in and redo partition sizes with gparted, but I'm not bothering at this point.

Mac user running Ubuntu 16.04 (Unity, Gnome) on Dell XPS 13 (4gb RAM, 250gb SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04, Chromixium, Remix OS and Crunchbang++ on upgraded 11.6" Acer 1810TZ Olympic Edition (4gb RAM, 240 SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04 on Mac mini, iMac & Dell 7020

mfox
mfox's picture

Unfortunately, for the first task, I never saw the option you referred to and I just got a clone with a bunch of free space. So now I'm moving and expanding partitions on the clone. Hopefully it will do the same thing, just taking longer.

I also tried booting windows from the new SSD while it was external. Windows 10 started up but gave an error. However, after installing the new SSD internally, it was OK.

OK, all is well and I now have lots of space for all existing partitions, plus extra space to use for trying out new distros. The way it installed I had to manipulate all partitions (including Windows) with gparted from a live usb, but that worked. However, the Windows repair seems to have created another little partition. Any way that it can be deleted; I'm afraid that doing so will destroy the Windows installation.

Mac user running Ubuntu 16.04 (Unity, Gnome) on Dell XPS 13 (4gb RAM, 250gb SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04, Chromixium, Remix OS and Crunchbang++ on upgraded 11.6" Acer 1810TZ Olympic Edition (4gb RAM, 240 SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04 on Mac mini, iMac & Dell 7020

jasonw

How small is it? Are you sure it wasn't a restore partition that wasn't already there before? If it's really small (like under 5 GB), I'd just leave it.

Jason

Computer enthusiast, beginner programmer, political geek.

mfox
mfox's picture

It's only 128 MB. Gparted notes it as having an msftres flag, and gave it the name Microsoft Reserved partition with an unknown file system. With that partition, there are now 9 of them on the drive, only 2 of which are Linux partitions. There is no extended partition either. I always thought a drive is limited to 4 partitions without an extended. Is this not the case?

Mac user running Ubuntu 16.04 (Unity, Gnome) on Dell XPS 13 (4gb RAM, 250gb SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04, Chromixium, Remix OS and Crunchbang++ on upgraded 11.6" Acer 1810TZ Olympic Edition (4gb RAM, 240 SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04 on Mac mini, iMac & Dell 7020

jasonw

So it's sda1-9? The 4 primary partition limit applies to msdos partitions, I think. I'm guessing you're using a gpt partition table.

But you're saying that 7 of the partitions are Windows? That's kind of bizarre. A standard Windows install has two partitions, one for the boot system and one for the actual install, but some might opt for another one to keep personal data files on. But with 7, you must have old Windows partitions you haven't removed.

Jason

Computer enthusiast, beginner programmer, political geek.

mfox
mfox's picture

One of them is a backup. Several are small and I think two relate to bootloaders.

Mac user running Ubuntu 16.04 (Unity, Gnome) on Dell XPS 13 (4gb RAM, 250gb SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04, Chromixium, Remix OS and Crunchbang++ on upgraded 11.6" Acer 1810TZ Olympic Edition (4gb RAM, 240 SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04 on Mac mini, iMac & Dell 7020

mfox
mfox's picture

For the Dell, I tried making a disk image clone of the drive, but it didn't work. It had problems with the windows 10 partitions. Maybe it's a good thing this happened, because I found out that the the Samsung 850 EVO m.2 SSD I bought to replace the smaller Samsung drive in the Dell is much slower. I hadn't realized that the drive used in this laptop is a 950 Pro, which is lightening fast. To replace it with same spec would cost $250, and I don't need it at this point. So we'll hold firm until the prices for these go down a lot, or until I need it. I also picked up an Intel wifi card while I was at Canada Computers, and eventually I'll replace the Broadcom wifi card in the Dell with this one so that any Linux installation can detect wifi.

Mac user running Ubuntu 16.04 (Unity, Gnome) on Dell XPS 13 (4gb RAM, 250gb SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04, Chromixium, Remix OS and Crunchbang++ on upgraded 11.6" Acer 1810TZ Olympic Edition (4gb RAM, 240 SSD)
Ubuntu 16.04 on Mac mini, iMac & Dell 7020

jasonw

The wireless card in your Dell is that easy to replace? That's pretty cool.

Jason

Computer enthusiast, beginner programmer, political geek.

Pages