Author Topic: Manjaro 20.2.1  (Read 751 times)

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Offline fox

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Re: Manjaro 20.2.1
« Reply #30 on: July 18, 2021, 07:42:00 am »
The external drive was a consequence of the limited space on the internal drive. Its capacity is 500 gb, which might sound like a lot, but I also have the Mac OS on it. Aside from the Mac OS, it houses Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and 21.04. I suppose I don't need both, but I like to keep an LTS fallback just in case one of Ubuntu's 9 month upgrades goes south. When the next LTS comes out in 2022, I can delete one of them, giving me more internal SSD space to play with. Because this Mac has two Thunderbolt ports, I got the idea of putting "tryout" distros on an external drive. When Samsung came out with the T7 series of external SSDs, I bought a 500 gb for distro-hopping and storage of photos and important backup files. The T7 is fantastic when run in a Thunderbolt (or USB 3.2) port. On my Mac it feels every bit as fast as the internal drive.

Unfortunately, things get complicated when you need a bootloader that can properly list MacOS partitions as well as Linux and you also have an external drive. When you update a grub in a Linux partition, the default boot is on that drive. Unplug the drive and things can change. That's what seems to have happened in my case. What I can't figure out, though, is why the older Manjaro kernel would boot but the newer ones wouldn't. Perhaps the bootloader (called Refind), didn't pick up the right code for the newly installed kernel until the external drive was unplugged and replugged.
Ubuntu 21.04 on 2019 5k iMac
Ubuntu 20.04 and 18.04 on Dell XPS 13 2 in 1

Offline Jason

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Re: Manjaro 20.2.1
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2021, 10:37:29 am »
After I upgraded Xubuntu 20.04 to 20.10, I had a similar problem. You can usually hit ESC to see the boot messages. I saw in the bootup screen the list of messages and it seemed to get stuck on a particular partition. It kept doing the timeout countdown. And then it would but into maintenance mode (or something similar).  So I went into fstab and commented out the other partitions. It worked fine after that.


"I suppose I don't need both, but I like to keep an LTS fallback just in case one of Ubuntu's 9 month upgrades goes south."

That's exactly where Timeshift is very useful. I can't use it now unfortunately as I have 3 distros on a 128 GB drive and no external drive big enough.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2021, 10:45:43 am by Jason »
"With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world." - Max Ehrmann, Desiderata

Offline fox

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Re: Manjaro 20.2.1
« Reply #32 on: July 18, 2021, 01:45:17 pm »
After I upgraded Xubuntu 20.04 to 20.10, I had a similar problem. You can usually hit ESC to see the boot messages. I saw in the bootup screen the list of messages and it seemed to get stuck on a particular partition. It kept doing the timeout countdown. And then it would but into maintenance mode (or something similar).  So I went into fstab and commented out the other partitions. It worked fine after that.
....
Why would other partitions be in your fstab, unless they were for boot or swap?
Ubuntu 21.04 on 2019 5k iMac
Ubuntu 20.04 and 18.04 on Dell XPS 13 2 in 1

Offline Jason

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Re: Manjaro 20.2.1
« Reply #33 on: July 18, 2021, 04:36:47 pm »
Why would other partitions be in your fstab, unless they were for boot or swap?

I don't know. You saw the part about where I said it happened right after the upgrade, right? I don't know why the upgrade changed that file to automount them. I assume it wasn't initially set up that way or I would have had the error before. They're other distros so they don't need to be available right after boot.

But other partitions/drives you might want to mount right away include /home, a place to do backups, for log files, for server files, etc. You might even want to mount network filesystems. If it's a backup directory and backups start automatically before or after login, you may need to have it ready to go.
"With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world." - Max Ehrmann, Desiderata