Linux & Android > Support

Powerline Networking

(1/5) > >>

fox:
What exactly is Ethernet over house wiring? Is this where you plug in a dongle and connect it via Ethernet cable to your computer? I tried one of these a few months ago and the speeds were terrible. (I brought it back.)

ssfc72:
I wouldn't describe it as a dongle.  There are 2 small ( maybe 2" X 3") boxes that have plug prongs to plug into the wall outlets in your house. The one sending unit you attach an ethernet cable to you modem or router and the other receiving unit plugs into a remote wall outlet, in your house, where you have a computer or tv and you hook an ethernet cable from the wall unit to your computer.

I believe Brian said  he has used them and they worked well and the devices come rated at different data speeds. The cheap older ones only may be able to do the 100 Mbps etherent speeds while the more expensive units would be able to do the Gb ethernet speeds.

Maybe your house wiring is not suitable for ethernet over powerline or the Brand you tried was not very good.  Talk to Brain P or Kal if you need better info. :-)

fox:
What I had was just a single unit that plugged into the wall. Nothing came with it that would be plugged into the router. So I suspect it was just picking up a wifi signal from the router and sending it via Ethernet to the computer attached to this unit.

Is what Brian was talking about also called a Powerline Network (see this article? If so these look to cost $100-200. The potential advantage to me is related to my 2019 iMac, in which the internal wifi connector doesn't work in Linux (no driver for it). Instead, I bought a USB wifi dongle, which does work, but takes one of my USB ports, and requires a special driver installation which I would have to do for any distro I want to try. I would be willing to buy an Ethernet over house device if not too expensive, but ones like those in the article I noted run $80-130 at Staples.

William:

--- Quote from: fox on March 04, 2021, 01:29:35 pm ---...  The potential advantage to me is related to my 2019 iMac, in which the internal wifi connector doesn't work in Linux (no driver for it). Instead, I bought a USB wifi dongle, which does work, but takes one of my USB ports, and requires a special driver installation which I would have to do for any distro I want to try. ...

--- End quote ---

Why didn't you buy USB wifi dongle or USB-to-Ethernet dongle that Linux supported?  Then, you would be all set.  They are cheap, and Asus is pretty good in terms of quality and Linux support.  Nowdays, you actually have to work at it, to not get it to work on Linux.

If you want ethernet wire into your mac, then try something like Asus RP-N12 repeater.  Keyword in description is "media bridge" or "client mode".  I use it to connect my ethernet devices in my basement to main floor router.  It's wire between devices and the repeater, and it's wifi between the repeater and the router.  Canada Computer no longer sells it, but does sell RP-AC55 (I guess, AC version instead of N).  Other people say that TP-LINK TL-WR802N works for this purpose, though I don't trust its quality.

gmiller1977:
I'm sorry I missed this chat.  I completely forgot about it.

I have Powerline Ethernet in my house.  I got sick of Wifi interference in the area as more APs came online.  I bought TP-Link units for my home and they work fantastic.  Faster than 100Mbit, not quite as fast as Gbit.  I just use a switch upstairs for the computers and then uplink from the switch to the Powerline Ethernet to go to other areas of my house.  I bought 2 starter kits because the cost of 2 starter kits was cheaper than 4 individual units (go figure).

It lets you get Ethernet to areas that you would have difficulty getting it to, for example, my office is on the second floor of the house, on the north side, but my internet connectivity is on the lower level on the south side.... and I don't have any bulkheads I can go through to get CAT5/6 there without going outside, on a 4/12 pitched roof..... no thanks.  Weatherized CAT5/6 cable is also WAY more expensive than what I paid for these units.

I've read reports that you can get slow speeds if the wiring in your house is old, or, if you have aluminium wiring.  Not sure if this is true.

Wifi can work in many cases, but in others it cannot. 

My VoIP phone is wired.
Plex transcodes over wire better than wifi because of the bandwidth available.

I only use WiFi for cell phones, tablets, consoles, and printers.  Otherwise, I prefer cabled connections.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version